Coastal population

The number of people in coastal cities and towns is a suggested indicator for State of the Environment reporting (e.g. Indicator 7.6 in the Estuaries and the Sea volume) [1].

Photo of Canal estates near Tweed, NSW view out to Sydney Harbour (photos by Emma Murray)

Photo 1. (a) Canal estates near Tweed, NSW and (b) view out to Sydney Harbour (photos by Emma Murray)

Coastal issues arising from coastal populations

Many of the factors that degrade coastal environments are related to the size of the local human population (both resident and transient) [1]. Those factors include the density of roads, housing and other infrastructure, and can contribute to the degradation of coastal waterways through:

The above impacts can give rise to eutrophication and runoff from acid sulfate soils and related issues (e.g. algal blooms, anoxic & hypoxic events, fish kills and shellfish closures), and can contribute to and to an overall reduction in biodiversity.

Existing information and data

More information on coastal population as an indicator can be found in the Estuaries and the Sea volume of Environmental Indicators for National State of the Environment Reporting [1].

Back to top of page


References

  1. Ward, T., Butler, E. and Hill, B. 1998. Environmental Indicators for National State of the Environment Reporting, Estuaries and the Sea, Commonwealth of Australia, pp. 81.

Back to top of page